Disqus for Friday The 13th: The Film Franchise




He's Killing Me! Rob's Death In 'The Final Chapter'

Many people will agree that Rob's death in Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter is one of the most tense and shocking moments in the film series. This fact is not because of any gore or special effects tricks that are used for the scene, but more because of what the character says in the experience of his death. Surprisingly, not everyone would agree, initially, with the character's reaction to Jason beginning to kill him.

Actor Erich Anderson, who portrayed Rob in the film, mentioned in an interview that when he read the script he thought the line, "He's killing me!", was the stupidest thing you could say in that situation.

However, after Erich Anderson actually looked further at the situation, he realized that his death scene transformed the audiences take on Jason Voorhees. Jason was no longer this iconic figure that the audience was rooting for in killing a bunch of kids, but now he was this monster that killed a man looking to avenge his sister's death. This one death scene created a new level of tension in the film and left the audience with a very real sense that now the characters of Trish and Tommy Jarvis were all alone to deal with Jason Voorhees on their own.

Where The Line, "He's Killing Me" Came From
In the book, Crystal Lake Memories, Director Joseph Zito explains where his idea for the line was derived from. He states that he read an article in a New York newspaper one day about a man being stabbed repeatedly while yelling out, "Please stop hurting me, please stop killing me". The story really stuck with the Director as he viewed the tragic death as the victim was speaking to the assailant in a conversation. The fact that the victim saw himself being murdered with the chance to talk to the killer was much more impactful than just a teen being knocked off with a quick kill and some gore effects.

The Director was correct in his thinking as Rob's death scene in Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter completely changed the tone for the rest of that film. Audiences were instantly transformed into caring for the remaining survivors and not rooting for their demise. Jason became what he truly is, an unstoppable killing machine taking the lives of innocense. Well, at least in this one film, he was not so unstoppable after all.
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